“Preserving, Protecting and Promoting the Dakota Culture for Future Generations”
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Zoom Meeting Discussion Federal Recognition Press Release on June 21, 2021.

Mendota Dakota Mdewakanton Tribal Community Discussion Federal Recognition Meeting Press Release

If the video doesn’t work, or if you prefer to download it, here is the video hosted in Zoom:
Press Release 6/21/2021

Reply to us as to what you think of the video?

Thank you Greg Strandmark Historian and Sharon Lennartson Tribal Chairwoman.

I will add more names of people to thank, soon as I complete the list.

Love Sharon

Minnesota Governor Walz “can’t” stop line 3, by Susu Jeffrey

By Susu Jeffrey  Original to Rise Up Times  August 9, 2021

“I can’t stop Line 3,” Gov. Walz said on July 11, “because the next governor can start it again.” Governor Walz is already running to be the next governor and has never declared opposition to Line 3.

The Walz administration did a pro forma appeal via the Department. of Commerce. He’s playing both sides.

The Governor’s conundrum is that while he positions himself against fossil fuel use exacerbating climate change, he champions Line 3. Currently Line 3 can transport 390,000 barrels of oil daily. The new line would double that capacity to 790,000 barrels per day cutting across Native ricelands.

Since Governor Walz taught geography for 20 years he must be aware of wetland-saturated northern Minnesota and the effect of water extraction on Native ricelands, especially in a drought year.”

The Minnesota Chamber of Commerce in September of 2017 declared that an increase of imported tar sands oil is not needed. Chamber Commissioner Steve Kelley was removed from office by the state senate in 2020. Laura Bishop, Minnesota Pollution Control Agency commissioner, resigned in July 2021 just before a senate vote against her confirmation threatened.

After these selected vacancies of state environmental leadership and three years of modified paperwork, the need to double imported Canadian tar sands oil was reassessed and Enbridge’s Line 3 project was okayed.

In fact, the Minnesota Supreme Court is still reviewing an appeal of the Line 3 project based on declining need for increased fossil fuel brought by Honor the Earth, White Earth and Red Lake Anishinaabe bands, Sierra Club, Friends of the Headwaters and Youth Climate Intervenors.

Meanwhile the latest Enbridge Line 3 construction complication is a massive 5-billion-gallon dewatering scheme because the corporation failed to research the wetland-prone topography. Despite drought and the necessity for a water-rich rice-growing environment, groundwater is extracted and pumped away from below construction trenches to higher ground until after the pipe is laid and covered.

Since Governor Walz taught geography for 20 years he must be aware of wetland-saturated northern Minnesota and the effect of water extraction on Native rice-lands, especially in a drought year.

Minnesota is home to the headwaters of the three major North American watersheds that drain north to Hudson Bay, south down the Mississippi River to the Gulf of Mexico, and east out the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River to the North Atlantic Ocean. Slicing across all three watersheds are two black Enbridge tar sands oil pipelines from North Dakota to Superior, Wisconsin. The southern pipeline is the new “replacement” Line 3 that would carry more than 31-million gallons of oil daily, with a huge dump of carbon emissions into the earth’s atmosphere.

Temporary Jobs, Permanent Pollution

On July 6, Enbridge construction workers accidentally spilled 80-n to 100-gallons of drilling “mud” into the Willow River near Palisade, in what is called a “frac out.” After the spill was reported by water protectors, an Enbridge mitigation team cleaned-up the spill and declared “no long or short term” environmental impacts. Enbridge did not announce the accident until July 13, after the clean-up was completed.

In 1991 near Grand Rapids, the Enbridge Line 3 pipeline ruptured discharging 1.7-million gallons of oil. From the 2010 Enbridge pipeline leak near Kalamazoo, Michigan, 800,000 gallons of tar sands oil required years of clean-up costing more than $1-billion. The unsuccessful cleansing efforts finally resulted in digging up the creek bottom and heating, baking it, which transferred the toxins from the soil into the air.

The price of refining extremely dirty sands oil makes it almost prohibitive except for the economic concept that a finished good should cost more than production costs in order to make a profit. Production costs include PAC (political action committee) “contributions” as well as fines and court expenses against Anishinaabe and non-Indian environmental legal challenges by land defenders.

Article 6, Section 2 of the US Constitution declares that all treaties “shall be the supreme law of the land.” Every single treaty between the United States and sovereign Indian nations has been violated. Because the seven federally recognized Anishinaabe bands in northern Minnesota have different positions on a new route for the tar sands oil pipeline, Governor Walz can play them off against each other.

The idea that “the Indians” speak with one voice is simplistic, not to mention racist. The Democrats, split between environmentalists and developers, don’t speak with one voice. This lockstep thinking keeps the dirtiest oil in the world gushing across the headwaters of the Mississippi, Hudson Bay and Great Lakes/Laurentian watershed divides.

If Line 3 ever goes on line, it would be equivalent to 50 new coal-fired power plants. An expected 50-year lifespan for a new Line 3 would enable the fossil fuel economy for another two generations.

Sicangu Youth Council help provide a formal burial at the Rosebud Indian Reservation

Vi Waln
Special to Indian Country Today

ROSEBUD INDIAN RESERVATION — Dora Her Pipe (Brave Bull) just wanted to go home.

After being ripped from her family in South Dakota at 16 and shipped 1,500 miles to the Carlisle Indian Industrial School in 1879, she asked to be sent home in January 1881 because of illness.

Just three months later, she was dead. It would take another 140 years before she returned to her family and her homelands, wrapped in a buffalo robe in a cedar box.

“My sisters, brother and I are the fifth-generation descendants of Her Pipe,” Bernadine Red Bear, daughter of the late Christine Crow Dog-Red Bear, told a group gathered Saturday, July 17, at the public burial service for the children.

“We didn’t know we had a relative in Carlisle. We are the only living family members to take care of our relative, Dora Her Pipe (Brave Bull).”

Dora, the daughter of Brave Bull, was among nine Sicangu ancestors to make it home last week, more than a century after they died at the notorious boarding school. They were escorted home to Rosebud Friday, stopping first at Whetstone Bay, where they had taken a steamboat to Pennsylvania in 1879.

On Saturday, they finally were laid to rest at the Rosebud Indian Reservation with public and private ceremonies, prayers and honor songs.

“When I went to Whetstone Bay, they told me this was the last time they saw their relatives,” Red Bear said at the service. “I could only imagine her saying in Lakota, ‘Mother, I don’t want to go. Father, help me, I don’t want to go.’

“We have our children and grandchildren here with us today,” Red Bear said. “How would you feel if someone just came and took them away from you? They [the wasicu] are cowards; they take children and they do this to them.

“Today, I’m happy for my mother’s tribe, the Sicangu Oyate, and what they did for these children.”

Just children

The children ranged in age from 10 to 18 when they left for Carlisle. Most of the girls went for three-year terms; the boys, for five-year terms, according to school records.

In addition to Dora, there was Dennis Strikes First (Blue Tomahawk); Rose Long Face (Little Hawk); Lucy Take The Tail (Pretty Eagle); Warren Painter (Bear Paints Dirt); Ernest Knocks Off (White Thunder); Maud Little Girl (Swift Bear); Friend Hollow Horn Bear; and Alvan (Roaster), who was also called Kills Seven Horses and One That Kills Seven Horses.

Six of the children — Dora, Dennis, Maud, Rose, Alvan and Ernest — were in the first group from Pine Ridge and Rosebud to be sent to the school. They arrived Oct. 6, 1879, and within two years, five would be dead from pneumonia, measles, infections or other causes.

The return this month of the ancestral remains comes as international scrutiny has focused on the history of Indigenous boarding schools in North America. Nearly 1,000 unmarked graves have been discovered at former residential schools in Canada, and researchers in the United States are now working to find graves at boarding schools here.

Details are sketchy in the U.S. about the number of schools and students who attended. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland, Laguna Pueblo, has launched an initiative to cull through government records to identify the children who attended and find those who were buried without their families.

The Carlisle school became the prototype for both the U.S. and Canadian boarding schools. The founder of Carlisle was Army Brigadier General Richard Henry Pratt, whose infamous comment, “kill the Indian, save the man,” defined the assimilationist policies and militaristic system that forced children to cut their hair, abandon their Native clothing and disavow their language.

The Rosebud children were among 10 students whose remains were disinterred at the school; the remains of an Alaskan Aleut child were returned home earlier this year. The return followed years of work by Sicangu Youth Council members, who visited the school then pushed to have their relatives returned.

In all, more than 190 children died at Carlisle from the time it opened in 1879 until it closed in 1918.

A studio portrait from about 1880 shows Ernest (Knocks Off), Sicangu Oyate, wearing a Carlisle Indian Industrial School uniform. Ernest arrived at the school in the first group of students from Pine Ridge and Rosebud on Oct. 6, 1879, and died on Dec. 13, 1880. His remains were finally shipped home to his family 140 years later in July 2021. (Photo courtesy of the Cumberland County Historical Society)

A studio portrait from about 1880 shows Ernest (Knocks Off) wearing a Carlisle Indian School uniform. Ernest arrived at the school in the first group of students from Pine Ridge and Rosebud on Oct. 6, 1879, and died on Dec. 13, 1880. His remains were finally shipped home to his family 140 years later in July 2021. (Photo courtesy of the Cumberland County Historical Society)

The first deaths

Ernest and Maud were the first of the Rosebud group to die at Carlisle, passing within hours of each other just 14 months after they arrived at the school.

School records indicate that Ernest, 18, had a sore throat and was sent to the hospital in October 1880. Officials reported that he did not want to take the “disagreeable” treatment, and refused medicine and food, according to a report on the two deaths. He died Dec. 14, 1881.

Maud, 17, died the same day — the first girl to die at the school, according to the report.

Officials at the time reported she died of pneumonia, saying she had weakened lungs and could not resist infection. But that’s not the story tribal members learned when they visited the school site last month.

Ione Quigley, the tribal historical preservation officer at Rosebud who helped prepare the remains for the trip back to South Dakota, said officials told them there were three bodies in the grave — Maud and two younger, unidentified children.

There is no record at Carlisle of three children buried in one grave, and a ceremony was later held at Rosebud seeking spiritual guidance.

“We were told after ceremony that she took two little ones with her and ran away,” Quigley said. “They froze and were all buried together… I reminded the Army officials that they give their word that they won’t leave a comrade behind, but they separated the three sets of remains of our ancestors.”

Quigley said the deaths of the three children are evidence that conditions at the school were very poor. She believes the other two children are also Rosebud children.

“She would not have left the school unless something was wrong,” she said. “She wouldn’t have taken just any child; she would have taken her own relatives. I was frustrated that we couldn’t bring them back with her. The Army would not let the remains go because they were named as ‘unknown.’”

She continued, “There are six graves in the cemetery at Carlisle that are labeled Sioux, so they could be from any one of our tribes. There are also 16 children buried in graves who are listed as unknown.”

Dennis, 13, died less than a month after Maud and the children, on Jan. 10, 1881, of what was reported as typhoid pneumonia.

‘Suffocation attacks’

The day after Dennis died, Dora was admitted to the hospital with chest pain and fever, according to a physician’s report included among school records collected from the Carlisle school at the Cumberland County Historical Society.

It was about that time that she asked to go home to her family, Red Bear said.

This photo, taken about 1880, shows Dora Her Pipe (Brave Bull), Rosebud Sioux,  seated, with Fanny Knife Holder, Kiowa. Dora arrived at the school at age 16 on Oct. 6, 1879, with the first group of students from Rosebud and Pine Ridge. She died of what was believed to be pneumonia on April 24, 1881.  Fanny, 10, arrived a few weeks later, on Oct. 27, 1879, but left the following August in ill health, according to school records. (Photo courtesy of the Cumberland County Historical Society)

This photo, taken about 1880, shows Dora Her Pipe (Brave Bull), Sicangu, seated, with Fanny Knife Holder, Kiowa. Dora arrived at the school at age 16 on Oct. 6, 1879, with the first group of students from Rosebud and Pine Ridge. She died of what was believed to be pneumonia on April 24, 1881. Fanny, 10, arrived a few weeks later, on Oct. 27, 1879, but left the following August in ill health, according to school records. (Photo courtesy of the Cumberland County Historical Society)

“Our little grandmother got sick several times,” Red Bear said at the burial Saturday. “She requested to come home in January 1881 because of her illness, but they didn’t let her come home. When she died, they kept her there and buried her there when they could have brought her home.”

Dora had seemed to improve at first, and then worsened. She was assumed to have contracted measles, since the school was in the midst of what the doctor described as a “measles epidemic.” She later developed bronchitis so severe that she had “suffocation attacks,” and died April 24, 1881, the doctor said.

“The succession of diseases, pneumonia, measles, bronchitis, proved more than she could endure,” the doctor concluded in his letter notifying the commissioner of Indian Affairs of her death.

Rose died just five days after Dora.

The doctor notified Pratt of Rose’s death in a letter dated May 4, 1881. The doctor reported she started treatment March 29 for congestion and pain in her chest, but did not have obvious signs of measles.

She began to run a high fever, and the doctor suspected she had pneumonia. Within a month, she was dead.

“She became weak and much debilitated and died suddenly and unexpectedly,” he wrote. “The immediate cause of death being, as I believe, congestion of lungs, brought on by sudden chill.”

‘He is better now’

Alvan, who was 12 when he arrived, lived more than two years at Carlisle. Although the cause of his death on March 29, 1882, is not known, the newspaper of the Carlisle Barracks printed a note from another tribal citizen reporting the boy’s death.

“Day before yesterday one of the Sioux boys died,” wrote Luther Standing Bear on March 31, 1882. “We were very glad for him. Because he is better now than he was on Earth.”

Quigley, the Rosebud historical preservation officer, said Standing Bear’s comments offer another look into the grim conditions at the school. He was a Carlisle survivor who later recounted the story in a book.

“I cried,” she said, “because when a child says of another child that ‘he is in a better place,’ something horrible must have made them think that way.”

A group portrait shows the first female students to arrive at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School from the Pine Ridge and Rosebud Sioux reservations on October 6, 1879. Several of the girls in the photo later died and were buried at the school for more than 140 years before finally being sent to their relatives in South Dakota in July 2021. School matron Sarah Mather is standing at left and interpreter Charles Tackett is standing at right. (Photo courtesy of the Cumberland County Historical Society)

A group portrait shows the first female students to arrive at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School from the Pine Ridge and Rosebud Sioux reservations on October 6, 1879. Several of the girls in the photo later died and were buried at the school for more than 140 years before finally being sent to their relatives in South Dakota in July 2021. School matron Sarah Mather is standing at left and interpreter Charles Tackett is standing at right. (Photo courtesy of the Cumberland County Historical Society)

The last three ancestors came to Rosebud over the next two years. Warren arrived on Nov. 30, 1882, at age 15. Lucy and Friend arrived on Nov. 14, 1883.

Lucy was just 10 when she arrived at Carlisle. She died just four months later, on March 9, 1884. A note in the newspaper said she “was not in health” when she arrived, but additional details were not provided.

Warren died six months after Lucy, on Sept. 30, 1884. He had been sent out in April 1884 to work with a Pennsylvania farmer, described as a “patron” in school records, but returned in August.

There is no mention in school records whether Warren was sent back because he was sick, though he died just a month after returning to the school. A line in a school ledger notes only, “Warren Painter died.”

A group portrait shows the first male students to arrive at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School from Pine Ridge and Rosebud on October 6, 1879. Several of the boys in the photo later died and were buried at the school for more than 140 years before finally being sent to their relatives in South Dakota in July 2021. School founder Richard Henry Pratt is standing at left, and interpreter Charles Tackett is standing at right. (Photo courtesy of the Cumberland County Historical Society)

A group portrait shows the first male students to arrive at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School from Pine Ridge and Rosebud on October 6, 1879. Several of the boys in the photo later died and were buried at the school for more than 140 years before finally being sent to their relatives in South Dakota in July 2021. School founder Richard Henry Pratt is standing at left, and interpreter Charles Tackett is standing at right. (Photo courtesy of the Cumberland County Historical Society)

Friend, who was 17 when he arrived, stayed with the school system for more than two years before he died on May 21, 1886. Little information is available about his death, but it was also noted in a school ledger, “Friend H.H.B. died.”

A final homecoming

Sicangu tribal and spiritual leaders, along with several young Lakota adults, worked together Saturday to give the ancestors a traditional burial.

Quigley worked ahead to prepare them for the journey, carefully wrapping each child’s remains in a buffalo robe and placing them in a cedar box. Earth from the grave was also included in the box, in case bone fragments had fallen loose into the ground.

Quigley expressed gratitude to Sicangu medicine man Waycee His Holy Horse, as well as the late Chief Leonard Crow Dog, for preparing her to bring the ancestors home.

“Grandpa Crow Dog told me about Dora,” Quigley said. “She was meant to come home and hold the pipe for her people. She never got the chance to do that.”

Crow Dog, who has since died, left instructions for how the relatives should be cared for, she said.

And so they were.

On Saturday, a military color guard of eight Native women soldiers assisted with the funeral and public burials. They stood guard by the small graves, holding an American flag, a Rosebud Sioux Tribal Flag and an orange flag made especially for the occasion.

Several young people, including members of the Sicangu Youth Council, oversaw the burial at the veteran’s cemetery, stepping into the open graves to lower the remains inside.

The first item put into the ground was dirt at the bottom of the cedar boxes. Then came the buffalo robe bundle that held the remains. Gifts provided by the Rosebud Sioux Tribe, family members and others were placed on top of the bundle, then covered with a specially made star quilt. Soil that had surrounded each grave at Carlisle was poured on top.

Each ancestor was gifted a Rosebud Sioux tribal flag and a prayer flag. The Army also provided an American flag for each child. The flags were presented to family members or the young people who sparked the return of the nine ancestors.

Prayers were offered at the public gravesites by medicine men Richard Moves Camp and Keith Horse Looking. The Red Leaf singers sang the Little Big Horn memorial song, as well as a prayer and honor song.

“Today is a day of healing. I’m very proud to be Lakota,” Moves Camp said.

“We can’t be sad anymore,” he said. “Today, we proudly bring our relatives home. Now, let’s take better care of our children, so that they are not running around in the street, drinking alcohol or using drugs. Let’s prepare our children for a good future. Now it’s time for us to learn our ancestors’ teachings. We must learn to speak the language. We must learn about our culture.

“Bring the old teachings to the modern world.”

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Homicide body dumped in a car by Coldwater. Please come to purifying event

Dear All,

Sorry to report. There was apparently a homicide with the body dumped in a car, parked at the Coldwater entrance. An accelerant was used to set the car afire Thursday night about 11 pm.

Lon Navarre has agreed to sage at Coldwater, tomorrow morning, Saturday, May 29. Meet at the Coldwater entrance at 10 am.

Last summer the National Park Service grounds-keeper, Neil, found a body hanged on an oak tree over by the tree line near where some rock seats are placed in a circle. We hope to sage that area also.

Please come to this sage-purifying event if you can. We know this is the right thing to do.

Sharon Lennartson and the Faribault Dakota Project

Jeff Jarvis Faribault Dakota Project Mendota Dakota Sharon Lennartson Mdewakanton

Sharon Lennartson, tribal headwoman of the Mendota Mdewakanton Dakota Community, exploded with joy when she learned of the Faribault Dakota Project in the works.

“I yelled and screamed to my boys, “Somebody’s finally going to listen,’” Lennartson recalls. I wanted every bit to be a part of it.”

In partnership with the Faribault Heritage Preservation Commission, Rice County Historical Society, Faribault Mural Society and Santee Sioux Nation, the Mendota Dakota Community will offer historical insight to a project that will honor the Dakotas’ impact on Faribault’s early years.

Jeff Jarvis, a Faribault artist, designer and historian, connected with Lennartson after taking the lead on the project.

The idea for the memorial began several months ago when the commission became aware of a hand-drawn map that illustrated where Native Americans had lived on city namesake Alexander Faribault’s property after the Dakota Uprising. Faribault and Bishop Henry Whipple both wanted to protect the Dakota, who had helped Minnesota settlers during the U.S.-Dakota War, from being banished from the state.

Although the HPC initially envisioned land near the River Bend Nature Center as the location for the Faribault Dakota memorial, the new options include Peace Park, the Buckham Memorial Library Plaza and Heritage Park. The project is expected to begin in 2021.

Jarvis plans to combine written word, artwork and photography to depict the story of the Faribault Dakota on a three-panel interpretive sign. The panels will provide backstory of the Faribault Dakota community, including a history of the Wahpekute, partnerships that supported Native Americans in Faribault, maps, timelines, photos of tribe leader and Dakota verbiage with English translations.

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Sharon Lennartson, tribal headwoman of the Mendota Mdewakanton Dakota Community, exploded with joy when she learned of the Faribault Dakota Project in the works.

“I yelled and screamed to my boys, “Somebody’s finally going to listen,’” Lennartson recalls. I wanted every bit to be a part of it.”

In partnership with the Faribault Heritage Preservation Commission, Rice County Historical Society, Faribault Mural Society and Santee Sioux Nation, the Mendota Dakota Community will offer historical insight to a project that will honor the Dakotas’ impact on Faribault’s early years.

Jeff Jarvis, a Faribault artist, designer and historian, connected with Lennartson after taking the lead on the project.

The idea for the memorial began several months ago when the commission became aware of a hand-drawn map that illustrated where Native Americans had lived on city namesake Alexander Faribault’s property after the Dakota Uprising. Faribault and Bishop Henry Whipple both wanted to protect the Dakota, who had helped Minnesota settlers during the U.S.-Dakota War, from being banished from the state.

Although the HPC initially envisioned land near the River Bend Nature Center as the location for the Faribault Dakota memorial, the new options include Peace Park, the Buckham Memorial Library Plaza and Heritage Park. The project is expected to begin in 2021.

Jarvis plans to combine written word, artwork and photography to depict the story of the Faribault Dakota on a three-panel interpretive sign. The panels will provide backstory of the Faribault Dakota community, including a history of the Wahpekute, partnerships that supported Native Americans in Faribault, maps, timelines, photos of tribe leader and Dakota verbiage with English translations.

“That was the first time any of us at the office had seen [the map],” Lennartson said.

One of the houses on the map is labeled “LeClair,” which could refer to Lennartson’s great-grandfather, Wakon LeClair, who was Alexander Faribault’s helper. Lennartson explained “Wakon” means “holy,” and her great-grandfather was a medicine man or spiritual advisor. Her family tree also contains Faribaults and a common ancestor with Chief Little Crow, acclaimed leader of the Mdewakanton from 1846 to 1863.

Thinking about the project and what it means to have her people recognized, Lennartson recalls the tragic stories of her late grandparents, Lily and Albert LeClair. Her grandmother died at her Mendota home after the medical staff at a hospital failed to take proper care of her, and her grandfather, who broke his back in a car accident on the reservation, was turned away by another hospital because he was a Native American. He suffered for months because the hospital that did take him in didn’t have the proper medical equipment to treat his broken back, and Lennartson said he “died of a broken heart.”

Lennartson herself was not raised Native, but she and other Mdewakanton descendants started the Mendota Dakota Community nearly 25 years ago to return to their roots. Other members of the tribal council will have opportunities to share their input for the Faribault Dakota Project, and so will members of the Santee Sioux Nation and Lower Sioux Agency.

The Mendota Dakota people have been in Minnesota for thousands of years, Lennartson said, and Dakota ancestors and descendants have been in Mendota for over 130 years. She and the others in the Mendota Dakota community are related to Chief Cetanwakanmani, Chief Taoyatwduta from the 1862 war, and Chief Wabasha as well as Agathe Winona Red Woman Angelique DuPuis Renville and Mazasnawin Iron Woman Rosalie Freniere. Some of their ancestors are from Little Crow’s village, Kaposia.

“This is about as happy as I’ve ever been,” Lennartson said of the announcement of the Faribault Dakota Project. “It’s time … Just to know that different families are recognized and not forgotten — they’ll never be forgotten.”

This story written by MISTY SCHWAB misty.schwab@apgsomn.com

Sharon Lennartson Dakota Project Aug 2020 Mdewakanton Mendota.jpg

Radio interview with Dan “The Oak Man” Keiser

Dan Keiser, The Oak Man by Brigitta Greene
The Mendota Dakota tribal community honored arborist Dan Keiser [pictured] at their annual pow wow in September of 2019. Keiser goes by “Oak Man,” a nickname he acquired during the years-long standoff over the construction of Highway 55 in the late 90s. The protest pitted environmental activists and native communities against MnDOT. A central symbol of the fight were four bur oak trees, well over 100 years old, that native communities believed to be sacred, and highway officials said needed to be cleared. The highway ultimately won out, and – 20 years ago this December – the trees came down. But behind the scenes, Keiser took cuttings from the oaks and brought them to an expert who was able to graft them onto new saplings. Keiser then transplanted the grafted trees on the historic grounds of St. Peter’s church in Mendota, and still cares for them today.

Message from Dan: 

If you have about 10 minutes, check out this piece that KFAI radio aired
just last night! The whole show is an hour long, skip over most of it
(like 50 minutes), but tune into the interview from point 12:00 to 21:40.

https://www.kfai.org/episode/09-18-2019-minneculture-presents

Dan Keiser, "Dan The Oak Man" radio talk show

Dan Keiser, “Dan The Oak Man” radio talk show

CUI Notice Federal Register Publication – human remains from Iowa

Good afternoon,

After conversation with George Garvin last week, I’d like to start making plans for reburial of the 138 individuals and 32 associated funerary objects in the attached Notice. As you know, the Ho-Chunk Nation has taken the lead in submitting a claim; I also received letters in support of this from the Otoe-Missouria, the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, and the Three Affiliated Tribes.  I’ve been given the go ahead by George to start making arrangements, but do want to be as inclusive as possible. Given their distribution and keeping with reburying as close as possible to original burial locations, it seems that we could conduct reburials at each of our four state-owned cemeteries. So at this time I’d like to arrange a meeting to begin planning

As a starting point, I propose that we meet on November 12, after the OSA’s Advisory Committee meeting, at 1pm, as there will be several of our Indian Advisory Council members here at the OSA, and we can also set up a conference call for others to call in. Please let me know if you’d like to participate, but the date and/or time don’t work for you.

Lara K. Noldner, PhD
Bioarchaeology Director
Office of the State Archaeologist
University of Iowa
700 S Clinton St.
Iowa City, IA
319-384-0740

CUI Iowa 2019-04911.pdf

CUI Iowa 2019 notice map

CUI Iowa 2019 notice map

The American Indian Religious Freedom Act 

Here’s a very interesting post concerning The American Indian Religious Freedom Act

AIRFA  is a US federal law and a joint resolution of Congress that was passed in 1978. It was created to protect and preserve the traditional religious rights and cultural practices of American Indians, Eskimos, Aleuts and Native Hawaiians. 

These rights include, but are not limited to, access of sacred sites, repatriation of sacred objects held in museums, freedom to worship through ceremonial and traditional rites, including within prisons, and use and possession of objects considered sacred.  The Act required policies of all governmental agencies to eliminate interference with the free exercise of Native religion, based on the First Amendment, and to accommodate access to and use of religious sites to the extent that the use is practicable and is not inconsistent with an agency’s essential functions.  It also acknowledged the prior violation of that right.

To read the rest of this article, please visit: www.webpages.uidaho.edu/~rfrey/329AIRFA.htm

Image result for The American Indian Religious Freedom Act 1978

Benefit to send First Nation Youth & Elders to the Vatican to discuss Doctrine of Discovery.

Benefit to send First Nation Youth & Elders to the Vatican to discuss the historical and intergenerational trauma
triggered by the Doctrine of Discovery.

Youth are members of the Indigenous Youth Ceremonial Mentoring Society,
a Guadalupe Alternative program in St. Paul, Minnesota coordinated by Mitch Walking Elk.

Special Guests
include Keith Secola and Joe Savage.

With Waubanewquay Dorene Day, Max Gail, Prudence Johnson, Tom LeBlanc, Larry Long, Mitch Walking Elk.

Support the cause.

$20 pre-paid at www.youthtothevatican.eventbrite.com or $25 at the door

Hosted by First Universalist Environmental & Racial Justice Teams and Veterans for Peace, Minneapolis Chapter 27.

SUNDAY, MARCH 18 2018

1pm…….. Refreshments & Silent Auction
2-4pm…… Concert, Introduction of First Nation Youth

First Universalist Church
3400 Dupont Ave. South
Minneapolis, Mn. 55408
Questions? Call 612-825-1701

Click the image to enlarge or download the PDF here

Chris Mato Nunpa 500 Years of Indigenous Resistance VIDEO

Chris Mato Nunpa 500 Years of Indigenous Resistance from Bill Sorem on Vimeo.

Chris Mato Nunpa, Ph.D. retired Associate Professor of Indigenous Nations and Dakota Studies, Southwest Minnesota State University, Marshall, Minnesota. Mato Nunpa, a Dakota Elder, scholar and tireless advocate for indigenous rights, spoke on the 500 years of genocide of native peoples, killing many times more than the Nazi Holocaust by the government of the United States. In fact Hitler looked to the treatment of American indigenous people as a model for his “Solution to the Jewish problem.”

Mato Nunpa speaks from the heart and from many experiences with the resistance of indigenous people including the current events at Standing Rock in North Dakota.

#dap #NotOneDrop #DakotaAccessPipeline #StandingRockProtests#StandingRock #StandingRockPipeline #defunddapl
#ourrevolution #nodapl #standwithstandingrock #miniwiconi #WaterIsLife

Wahkon, Rum River, Minnesota

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This is an open Letter To County Commissioners Pondering Rum River Name-Change Effort written by Thomas Ivan Dahlheimer.

Mr. Dahlheimer requested that we post it. The views may or may not reflect that of the tribes.

Dear County Commissioners of Anoka, Isanti, Sherbrune and Mille Lacs Counties.

Greetings from the small town of Wahkon, Minnesota. It is where the headquarters of the Rum River Name Change Organization are located. I am the Executive Director and co-founder of this organization. I recently mailed a June 22, 2015 Star Tribune article about the movement to change the Rum River’s name to all of the county boards of commissioners of the counties where the “Rum River” flows. As you know, the article is entitled, Time to fix Rum River error?.

The purpose of this letter is to provide you with information that I believe can help all of the boards of county commissioners of this area to better understand the complex and controversial Rum River name-change issue, so that if you choose to, you can, hopefully, come to a well thought-out and good preliminary position on this issue. A position that would, I hope, influence you to-upon receiving the required signed petitions, call for, and later conduct-a public hearing wherein you would have the authority to decide to present the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources with a proposed new name for the river, a name that would most-likely become the river’s new name.

Several years ago, the Director of American Indian Studies at the U of M said that no one knows for sure how the river received its current English name, Rum, but because the popular derogatory legend behind the Rum River name, presented in Warren Upham’s book (as a fact), and published by the Minnesota Historical Society, has been in the public domain for a long time, she therefore concluded-that this is one good reason why the river’s English name should be changed.

The Dakota people’s name for the “Rum River” is Wahkon Wakpa. It translates into English as Spirit River. It “was changed by the white man to the most common spirituous liquor brought into the Northwest, rum, which brought misery and ruin to many of the Indians,” Upham said, calling it a “badly named river” and a “punning translation…a white man’s perversion of the ancient name.”

I believe in Upham’s account of how the river received its current English name. The Minnesota DNR is aware that there is no certainty as to how the river received its current English name, but, never-the-less, it decided that it is reasonable for me to believe that the name is derogatory…and, therefore, it is now guiding the process. Curt Brown stated is his Star Tribune article, Time to fix Rum River error?, that Peter Boulay of the DNR said “there are more derogatory names, such as Savage Lake…”

Jim Anderson (Mdewakanton Dakota) and Warren Upham expressed in the Star Tribune article that the river’s current English name is not compatible with the Dakota people’s sacred name for the river. The river is a sacred site with a sacred Dakota name. Its Dakota name can be spelled Wahkon, or Wakan. It hurts the Dakota people to see their sacred river desecrated with the current profane English name, Rum. I believe that this is another good reason why the river’s English name should be changed.

In Benjamin Franklin’s autobiography, 1791, he wrote: “If it be the design of Providence to extirpate these Savages in order to make room for cultivators of the Earth, it seems not improbable that rum may be the appointed means.” Renaming the Dakota people’s sacred river with the name of a chemical weapon of genocidal warfare, or, the poison rum, is, in my opinion, a grave injustice. I believe that this is another good reason why the river’s name, Rum, should be changed.

Rum and other spirituous liquors were used to help “steal the Dakota people’s land and language,” as well as ruin their traditional spirituality-associated with their sacred river. I believe that this is another good reason why the river’s disrespectful English name, Rum, should be changed.

In Chief Leonard Wabasha’s statement, presented on his interpretive sign at Mille Lacs Kathio State Park, he does not even use the disrespectful English name for the river, Rum, but refers to the river as “Spirit River.” And LeMoine LaPointe, Director of Healthy Nations at Minneapolis American Indian Center, said in an article entitled, A scouting party for the future: canoeing the Wakan Wakpa, “Rum is a pollutant, but the river is not a poison,” he said. “It is a holy river that contributed to generations of successful tribal communities.”

In the Mendota Mdewakanton Dakota Community’s letter of support, Jim Anderson, the Cultural Adviser for this community, wrote: We, as Dakotas, are very happy that there are people out there that are trying to understand that by using names like “rum” and “devil” to label sacred sites and places is degrading to our children, our elders and also to our ancestors. These places were already named in our language by our people because of their special meaning. When we have to tell our children why these places have been named after a poison or the worst words in their language. It is demoralizing to us to have to explain why a place is named after the same things that helped to steal our land and language. To have to be reminded of the cultural genocide that has been perpetrated on all Indian people. So, in changing the name back to the Dakota language, it will help in the healing process that our people continue to deal with.

I believe that the Rum River’s derogatory name will not be changed without this river name-change movement becoming highly influential in bringing about revolutionary social change.

A few years ago, the Minnesota Sesquicentennial Commission stated that ethnocide and genocide were committed against the Dakota people and that most Minnesotans are not aware, or, unable to accept, that these atrocities occurred. I believe that (1.) the cause of this negative situation is institutionalized laws and policies-associated with historic, Christian religious bigotry and white racism-combined. And that (2.) because of this problematic situation, most Minnesotans have a radical lack of empathy for, not only, the historical and current plight of the Dakota people, but also for the plight of all Indian people.

There is a large, and growing in popularity, global-international movement that is helping people who are caught up in national and international-institutionalized religious bigotry and racism…or, white racism associated with “international law,” a “law” which has been incorporated into many nation states, (sometimes called “the law of Christendom”) to get set free from it…or, set free from a radical lack of empathy for the historical and current plight of Indigenous peoples around the world. This movement is primarily focused on rectifying the injustices caused by the international legal construct known as the Doctrine of Christian Discovery.

The guiding principle of the Doctrine of Christian Discovery, a doctrine based on a series of 15th century Papal bulls, is that “white Christian supremacy” nullifies some of the most important basic human rights of indigenous peoples. The white colonizers believed that their Christian religion was the only true religion, therefore they considered it superior to the indigenous peoples’ religions. This was the basis for denying indigenous peoples three of their most important basic human rights.

When corresponding with a prominent resident of the City of Princeton, a person who was concerned with the economic cost associated with changing the Rum River’s name, I wrote: Our movement is to change the Rum River’s name. However, we would appreciate it if the city council would change the name of Princeton’s main street from “Rum River Drive” to some other name. I believe that the State of Minnesota should appropriate money to help Princeton and other cities on the river to pay for the cost of the transformation that is needed at this time. Think of the civil war and, afterwards, how much it cost people to set their slaves free.

I believe that the county boards of commissioners of the four counties who are foremost challenged with this controversial Rum River name-change effort should-before taking a definitive position on this issue, weigh in the balance… how much suffering their perspective counties would have to go through-including, the economic burden of changing the river’s name, with how much good they could do if they were to do their part in securing a new name for the river. I believe that you important boards of county commissioners should do this, and do it with not only a four county wide perspective, but also with a State of Minnesota, USA national, and global-international perspective.

In 2012, Arizona’s largest state-wide daily newspaper, The Arizona Republic, published an article by Dennis Wagner, titled Tribes embrace native names to preserve culture; subtitled: Return to original place names preserves cultures, fixes wrongs. As you know, Curt Brown’s article is titled, Time to fix Rum River error?. This same Wagner article, with a different title, was published in USA Today.

The article is about a national movement to preserve Native culture, by replacing derogatory place names, such as Squaw, Redskins, Savages, etc., with their original Native names. The movement is also about restoring Native names to sacred sites.

Dennis Wagner interviewed me for the article. The article includes a segment titled, Translation of insults, in it there are three paragraphs about my effort to change several Minnesota place names. “Snake River” and “Rum River” where mentioned. The movement to change the Rum River’s name back to its sacred Dakota name is part of a larger national movement to restore Native names to sacred sites.

When a board of county commissioners is focusing on the Rum River name-change proposal, and evaluating how it should officially weigh in, I believe that it should be aware of how the name-change movement is interrelated with other Indigenous peoples’ rights and advocacy movements.

The Chair of the Commission on Ecumenism and Interreligious Affairs for the Archdiocese of Minneapolis and Saint Paul, Father Erich Rutten, recently met with me in Anoka, where, as you known, the “Rum (Wahkon) River” flows into the Mississippi River. This meeting came about because of an article I wrote and the correspondence I gained (because of its contents) with some prominent Minnesota citizens and an internationally renowned Indigenous activist, Steven Newcomb, who gave his support behind the contents of my article. A section of the article addresses the controversial Doctrine of Christian Discovery issue. The article is entitled, Promoting Native Environmental Awareness Throughout The “Rum” (Wahkon) River Watershed.

When I met with Father Rutten, the Saint Paul area Council of Churches interfaith organization, SPIN, an organization that the Minnesota Council of Churches is involved with, was presenting a documentary on the Doctrine of Christian Discovery, a documentary co-produced by a renowned Minnesota Indigenous activist, Sheldon Wolfchild, and the internationally renowned Indigenous activist, Steven Newcomb. The Doctrine of Christian Discovery is the underlying and root cause of why there are so many derogatory geographic place names, including the Rum River’s name, that are offensive and hurtful to Indigenous peoples throughout the Americas, and elsewhere.

Indian Country Today Media Network (ICTMN), the world largest Indian news source, occasionally posts a selective comment or two, rarely three, to its articles. It almost always posts my comments. A lot of my comments are posted on Steven Newcomb’s articles. Newcomb is a world renowned expert on the Doctrine of Christian Discovery. He often writes ICTMN articles about the doctrine. The UN, Vatican and World Council of Churches are involved with the controversial Doctrine of Christian Discovery issue.

The UN Permanent Forum On Indigenous Issues, World Council of Churches, U.S. national Episcopal Church, U.S. national United Methodist Church, and thirteen Catholic groups (including Pax Christi International), etc., have repudiated the Doctrine of Christian Discovery. And more and more churches and organizations are being added to the list as the movement progresses and moves forward.

Mr. Newcomb had some input in the drafting of a resolution that Rep. Dean Urdahl asked me to write during a meeting with Dakota leaders near the Minnesota State Capital. Urdahl edited and introduced my resolution to the legislature. It contains statements about changing derogatory names and the Doctrine of Christian Discovery.

Many people believe that Newcomb is in the forefront of the global movement to rectify the injustices caused by the Doctrine of Christian Discovery. The last two sentences of a 284 word comment of mine-posted on a recent ICTMN article by Newcomb, read: American is beginning to repent of its supremacy sins. America’s Christian paradigm of domination over Indian peoples is coming to an end.

ICTMN recently published an article by Kevin Leecy, the Chair of the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council. The first sentence in my 426 word comment on Leecy’s article reads: This Kevin Leecy’s article is a sign among a number of other signs that indicate that Minnesota is coming into the forefront of the American and global movement that is shining a light on the dark chapters of colonialism, with the aim “to move beyond guilt and anger to real healing.”

Several years ago, the United Nations Secretariat of the Permanent Forum On Indigenous Issues, John Gordon Scott, wrote and thanked me for informing the United Nations about my movement to change the Rum River’s derogatory name. He alluded to an international movement to replace derogatory geographic place names that are offensive and hurtful to Indigenous Peoples around the world. The derogatory names, including the Rum River’s name, are products of colonialism, imperialism and racism-associated with the infamous, white Christian supremacy delusion, or, the Doctrine of Christian Discovery-and its instructions to colonizers to dehumanize and dominate/subjugate Indigenous peoples.

After you four important boards of county commissioners receive the required signed petitions, I hope that the above information will influence you to call for, and later conduct-a public hearing wherein you would choose to do your part in our state’s and nation’s governmental process to give the “Rum River” a new name, a name that would show due respect for the Dakota people and all indigenous people.

original letter can be found here:
http://www.towahkon.org/LetterToCountyCommissioners.html

Mendota Dakota Community Center to be demolished for restaurant parking

The Mendota Dakota tribal group has been struggling to keep the community center it has in Mendota, but the group was recently given a 60-day notice to vacate the property. The old house is planned to be demolished to be turned into a parking lot for the restaurant next door. While the group still has until the end of March to vacate, the cultural chairman Jim Anderson is moving his family into the house Saturday as a way of protesting that the Mendota Dakota have to leave the land. In this photo:] Anderson, front, prepares to head out to pick up a new load while his son Jim Anderson Jr. waits for his father.

image
Photo: David Joles, Star Tribune

The box spring for Jim Anderson’s bed wouldn’t fit coming up the stairs, so he and his friends shimmied it through a second-story window instead.

"That’s a tight fit, but it’s coming!" shouted an onlooker celebrating the small victory.

On Saturday, Anderson, a leader of the Mendota Mdewakanton Dakota Community, moved into the rundown house in Mendota that has served as the group’s community center, where he will be staying with his wife and 2-year-old daughter despite a plan to turn the property into a parking lot for a neighboring restaurant. The community consists of about 250 people.

The community was recently given notice that it must vacate the residence by the end of March. But Anderson said he intends to live in the house until the property owner is willing to negotiate and allow the group to stay.

"We’re tired of being run out of Mendota," Anderson said. "For the Dakota people, this is our sacred center, and it always has been. We need to keep our established place in this town."

mmdc parking

While the scenario may seem to be pulled straight from the classic Joni Mitchell song "Big Yellow Taxi," the aging house on Sibley Memorial Highway, which winds through the tiny town of Mendota, is far from a paradise.

The house was built in 1880. For several months, it had no water service, meaning toilets couldn’t be flushed and dishes couldn’t be washed until Anderson recently repaired it.

But still, it was a key gathering place for the group.

The Mendota Dakota community has a tumultuous history. Anderson says he is a descendant of a family that was promised land and money from the government but was never awarded it.

"It’s been a historical pattern to try to eradicate us," he said.

Mendota continues to be a place of spiritual significance for the Mendota Dakota, who traditionally believe that life began nearby where the Minnesota and Mississippi rivers meet.

Unlike the nearby Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community, the Mendota Dakota aren’t acknowledged by the federal government as a recognized tribe, a designation which would make the group eligible for funding and services from the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

In order for the Mendota Dakota to secure the rent to pay for the center over the past few years, the group relied on a grant from the Otto Bremer Foundation. The Mendota Dakota’s tribal council had hoped that it would be able to secure another grant from the foundation, but it was denied additional funds last year.

Need for parking

A short, evening drive down Sibley Memorial shows that parking is an issue in Mendota. Cars often line both sides of the highway.

"I drove up there last night and you had to park almost up near [the Church of St. Peter]," said Mendota Mayor Brian Mielke.

A representative of Axel’s River Grille next door to the Mendota Dakota center has put down a deposit to secure the purchase of the property, which according to Dakota County property records was recently valued at $185,500.

The plan to turn the property into a lot would give Axel’s about 24 additional parking spaces. Right now, the restaurant has to use overflow parking at the nearby VFW to help accommodate diners.

A couple of years ago, Lucky’s 13 Pub, the only other full-service restaurant in town besides Axel’s, purchased the property across the street from its building to turn into a parking lot, Mielke said.

The Axel’s sale isn’t final. The restaurant is working on a plan for a storm water management system for the site. There is going to be more discussion about the property at an upcoming city council meeting.

At this time, the city probably won’t get involved with Anderson’s move except to make sure there is working water in the building, said City Attorney Tom Lehmann.

Nicole Norfleet • 612-673-4495

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Lineal descendant lawsuit nearing a final ruling.

By Troy Krause, Editor
Redwood Gazette
Posted Jan 27, 2011

A lawsuit filed on behalf of thousands of lineal descendants of an 1886 U.S. census is nearing its end.

While rumors have called the suit dead, the reality is the case is alive and well. Redwood Falls native Erick Kaardal  represents approximately 7,000 of the 22,000 claimants in the case of Wolfchild vs. imagethe United States.

The basic claim of the suit is the United States in the 1880s placed land in a trust for those Mdewakanton Dakota who were loyal to the nation and were allowed to remain in Minnesota at the end of the Dakota Conflict.

That land was placed in a permanent trust at that time for those on the census list as well as for their descendants.
Over time, those lands, which include reservations at Lower Sioux, Prairie Island and Shakopee, have been taken out of the control of the lineal descendants by others who were allowed to return as part of the federal Indian Reorganization Act.

The suit claims the descendants have a right to that land based on the promise of the United States.
At a hearing held this past week in Washington, D.C. those involved in the case talked about the amount of money that could be involved in this claim, as casinos now exist on all three reservations, as well as who would and would not be considered a legitimate claimant.

imageOne of those who can trace his ancestry to a name on the census in Al Eller, who said his grandfather was Henry St. Clair.
Eller, who said since the suit was first filed, several claims have been made that are untrue, including a rumor a couple of years ago of what was called a white-out of casino employees.

The rumor was in regards to what is known as TERO, which gives preference to American Indians when job openings occur, so long as the individuals have the qualifications.
“These are just scare tactics,” said Eller, adding from his perspective when it comes to employees the best person for the job should have it.

A ruling has been handed down recently that allows for the allocation of a trust fund of $1 million given to those loyal Mdewakan-ton who ceded land to the U.S. in exchange for financial compensation. After the initial payments were ended due to the conflict, a new treaty was signed in 1868 that resumed the payments for that land turned over to the government.

A U.S. federal court judge sided with the tribe, and the hearing held this past week was directed by presiding Judge Charles Lettow to create a payment plan.
A series of scheduled dates held from February through May are intended to help create that plan before final judgment is handed down by the court.

“The Wolfchild case goes on,” said Kaardal, adding, however, the final resolution date of the case still remains unknown.
Copyright 2011 Redwood Falls Gazette. Some rights reserved

THIS STORY CAME FROM WWW.NEWSFORNATIVES.COM AND HAS BEEN COPIED TO WWW.MENDOTADAKOTA.COM

Mendota Dakota may lose center, News Article + photo

Mendota Dakota may lose center

By NICOLE NORFLEET, Star Tribune

September 4, 2010

The water at the two-story home of the Mendota Mdewakanton Dakota Community hasn’t been working for weeks. The garage door looks like a wrecking ball could have hit it. The wood foundation of the sweat lodge, which is supposed to serve as a spiritual haven, is left exposed without a tarp.

Tribal council members think they have enough money to pay the rent for the Mendota house that they’ve been using as a community center through October. But if they aren’t awarded a grant in the next couple of months, they don’t know what they’ll do after that.

"Our water’s been out for almost a month, and it’s ridiculous," said Jim Anderson, cultural chairman for the community. "These are the kind of struggles that we have all the time just to keep a place open that has our information, that has the history."

imageThe community center serves in many capacities to the 300-member Mendota Dakota community. It’s where members hold tribal council meetings, teach Dakota language classes and plan preservation efforts.

But even after the landlord reduced the monthly rent from $1,200 to $800 in July, money and time are running out. Funds from a three-year, $60,000 grant from the Otto Bremer Foundation are dwindling. Tribal council members are applying for another grant from the foundation this month.

"If things don’t change, we’ll probably be moving somewhere else at the end of October," said tribal council member Sharon Lennartson.

The location of the community center, which is up for sale by the owner, is important to the group, said some of its tribal council members. The place nearby where the Minnesota and Mississippi rivers meet is where the Mendota Dakota traditionally believe life began, Anderson said.

"It’s the place of our origin, the place of our genesis, the place where the Creator put us," he said.

While a location in Chaska has been brought up as an alternative, community members want to stay in Mendota. "This is where we’re from, and to lose that is a huge loss," said tribal vice chairman Jim Albrecht.

A feast in slim times

Even as they are trying to figure out the fate of their center, the Mendota are preparing for their annual powwow.

Unlike the recent powwow of their peers farther south, the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community, the Mendota group won’t be able to shoot off fireworks or offer thousands of dollars in prize money for the dancers. In Mendota, they couldn’t afford new T-shirts or buttons, so they are going to sell the ones from last year, Lennartson said.

Some people generalize when they think of Native Americans, she said. "They think, ‘Those rich Indians,’ but we’re far from it," she said. "We’re on the other side of the tracks."

The Shakopee own the Mystic Lake Casino Hotel and Little Six Casino, along with other enterprises. Plus, they are acknowledged by the federal government as a recognized tribe, giving them access to funding and services from the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

The Mendota Dakota applied for federal recognition in the late 1990s, but federal reviewers pointed to deficiencies and omissions in the group’s petition.

Reapplying would take resources and manpower, both of which the group is short of, Lennartson said.

She is paid $25 a week to serve as receptionist, webmaster and bookkeeper for the community, she said. For the past few weeks, she has been working more from home because the water isn’t working at the center.

Despite the uncertainty about the center and the community’s future, the Mendota Dakota are forging ahead.

"Somehow, we always seem able to put the powwow on and feed the people and everything else, so it works out," Anderson said. "The Creator has been watching out for us in good ways, but it gets hard trying to struggle just to pay the bills and to keep one place here."

Nicole Norfleet • 612-673-4495

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The local Twin Cities office of the National Park Service, known as MNRRA, the National Mississippi River and Recreation Area

The local Twin Cities office of the National Park Service, known as MNRRA, the National Mississippi River and Recreation Area, has provided clarification on who it was within the agency who made the decision almost four years ago to reject the findings of a government consultant–which stated in an Ethnographic Study, that Coldwater Spring at the Bureau of Mines Twin Cities Campus property near Fort Snelling in Hennepin County, Minnesota, is a place of traditional cultural importance for Dakota people.

more at http://minnesotahistory.net/?p=2565

Fire Talks at ColdWater 3-6-2010

First Nations United: To ensure the prosperity of the First Nation people and to bring about unification of all tribal nations through redefining our identity and connecting with our past!

FIRE TALKS!
Fire represents power, strength, life, and sustainability. First Nation people have used this life source in their ceremonies as a way of connecting us to the creator. Our ancestors gathered around fires and discussed many important issues that effected their tribe, community, and family. This connection to fire still remains for the First Nation people of Turtle Island. First Nations United would like to invite you to participate in FIRE TALKS! This is a bi-weekly intertribal gathering to develop a dialog about reclaiming the sacred site know as “Coldwater Spring.” Bring your ideas, history, and knowledge of this sacred site. _________________________________________________________________________
Location/Logistics: Coldwater Spring is south of Minnehaha Park in Minneapolis. From Hwy 55/Hiawatha, turn east (toward the Mississippi River) at 54th Street, take an immediate right (south) & follow the frontage road for a half mile past the pay parking meters, through the fence gates, & past the aqua brick building where you can park. This gathering is outside so please dress appropriate for the elements. A fire will be provided and some refreshments.

When: 1st & 3rd Sunday of every month 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Contact Information: George spears Chi-Noodin (612) 269 -5083
Gary Spears Migizi (952) 974-3257

The Crow Creek Sioux Tribe has settled its tax debt with the IRS.

The Crow Creek Sioux Tribe has settled its tax debt with the Internal Revenue Service and lined up a loan that will enable it to buy back the 11 square miles of land the IRS sold at auction in December, the tribal chairman said.
A stipulation filed in court last week indicates the tribe will dismiss its lawsuit, which sought to prevent the IRS from selling the Hyde County land. That will cancel a May 4 trial.
The IRS took the unusual step of seizing and selling the land because the tribe refused to pay $3.12 million in employment taxes, penalties and interest it racked up since 2001.
At $2.58 million, the winning bid did not fully satisfy the debt. But tribal chairman Brandon Sazue, who met with government officials in Washington last week, said the IRS is forgiving what’s left.
“We don’t owe the IRS anything at this point in time, as long as we drop the lawsuit,” Sazue said.
A spokesman for the Department of Justice’s tax division acknowledged a deal was struck but could not provide any detail.
“We were glad we were able to reach an amicable resolution of the case,” Charles Miller said.
The next step for the tribe is buying back the land; the auction sale came with a provision that the tribe had 180 days to do so.
Sazue said the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux in Minnesota have agreed to loan the Crow Creek Sioux $3 million to buy back the land. Shakopee Mdewakanton spokeswoman Tessa Lehto could not confirm the loan.
The Crow Creek also are working with the government to make sure they don’t get in tax trouble again. The tribe’s written complaint in the court file says they weren’t paying taxes because the Bureau of Indian Affairs wrongly advised them they were exempt.
Sazue said he wants to set up a mechanism that subtracts taxes from tribal councilors’ paychecks.
The chairman said he’s excited to put the tax problems to rest and get back the land.
Sazue spent three weeks on the land in December fasting and praying in protest of the IRS action. He said the tribe’s plight has spurred sympathetic calls and e-mails from as far as Europe and Australia.
“If I hadn’t set my trailer up there I don’t think we’d be where we are today,” he said.

WOLFCHILD V. UNITED STATES UPDATE: REQUEST RESPONSE BY 2/12/10

WOLFCHILD V. UNITED STATES (NO. 09-579); ZEPHIER V. U.S. (NO. 09-580) – On November 6, 2009,

two groups of individuals who claim to be descendants of the “loyal” Mdewakanton Sioux filed petitions

seeking review of a decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit which reversed the trial

court’s finding of breach of trust by the United States. Based on its determination that the finding of

breach of trust is a critical prerequisite to identifying which plaintiffs are entitled to relief and calculating

the measure of damages due, the trial court certified two questions for immediate appellate review. In

response, the Federal Circuit held that (1) the 1888, 1889 and 1890 Appropriation Acts enacted for the

benefit of the loyal Mdewakanton Sioux and their lineal descendants which included lands, improvements

to lands and monies as the corpus did not create a trust; and (2) if the referenced Appropriations Acts did

create a trust (which they did not), the 1980 Act terminated that trust by giving the three Mdewakanton

Indian communities beneficial ownership of the lands. The U.S. filed a waiver of its right to respond on

December 7, 2009, and the petitions were scheduled for conference on January 15, 2010. However, on

January 13, 2010, the Court issued a request for the United States file a response by February 12, 2010.

 

Download the entire TRIBAL-SUPREME-COURT-PROJECT-MEMORANDUM-FEBRUARY-1-2010-UPDATE-OF-RECENT-CASES

Newest updated news and events, politics and commentary www.NewsForNatives.com

Finding a new Native voice as an Independent -Obama

Written by Tim Giago (Nanwica Kciji) © 2010 Native Sun News Sunday, 31 January 2010 12:29

February 1, 2010

Like millions of other Americans I watched the State of the Union address by President Barack Obama almost as a moth drawn to a flame. I saw something afoot that I haven’t read about in the words of other columnists even though it was not something I expected.

Whenever the President made a point that may have been intended to draw the audience together, African American, white women and Democrats stood and cheered while their Republican counterparts sat on their hands.

The real problem with this is that

Continue reading

State of Emergency – Pine Ridge Indian Reservation

A State of Emergency has been declared on the Pine Ridge Lakota “Sioux”
Indian Reservation. People have died. Many more people are at risk of
freezing to death. Another cold front is coming in, yet where is the
national media coverage?

Does the ‘Lacreek Electric Company’ – a non-Indian utility often thought
to be prejudice, care that people are suffering, since they are pulling
meters every day? (which is illegal throughout the rest of the u.s.
during the winter months).

What will Obama and the federal government do about this? While they dig
out Haitians, indigenous people right here may freeze to death. What are we going to do about it?

Help put this message out for help. The children and families of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation need our help now. It is urgent that all 40,000 residents of the Oglala Nation have electricity and propane.

Call LaCreek toll free at 800-655-9324 or (605)685-6581 to see how you can
help pay into a customer’s account, example $5 into ten customers would
require a $50 donation by you. Tell LaCreek to make sure tanks are full
for ALL area residents between the months of November to March – and to
collect any delinquent payments between April and October.

Also, check out this non-profit to see if it is appropriate for you:
Arlene Catches The Enemy 605-867-5771 Ext 13.
Tax Deductable, Non-Profit (501-c-3). She can take credit cards over the
phone: Pine Ridge Emergency Fund, C/O Economic Development Administration
PO Box 669, Pine Ridge, SD 57770-0669

And call Lakota Plains Propane at 605-867-5199 and find out what homes have elderly or children and if they need money put down on their account to be
able to have a warm home tonight.

************ ******

List to assist Elders at Pine RidgeShare

Below are several Elders in the Kyle Community of Pine Ridge that are in immediate need of assistance. The contact information has been confirmed and permission has been granted to share their information with you.

There are several ways I will mention where assistance is needed and I’ll share here before I begin the information for where you can assist in paying for Propane for those who need it or to contact a local grocery store to pay for food for families who need this. Other ways of assisting the individual families will be listed with their contact information below.

To pay for propane for any individuals listed below use the information here and be sure to make your payment to the account of the individual(s) you choose to help. The propane company requires a minimum order of $120 of fuel before they will make a delivery to the individual. You can also pay for a persons propane and they will credit the individuals account so that when they do run out of any fuel they may have at the moment they can simply call and the company will deliver more.

Lakota Plains Propane (will take credit card)
Highway 407
Pine Ridge, SD 57770
605-867-5199
Be sure to request a receipt and use the contact for the person you are helping to call and followup to be certain they received the help you paid for.

Kyle Grocery (will take credit card)
Owner: Liz May
605-455-2824
Again be sure to follow up with the person you make a donation for to be sure they received the appropriate credit for purchasing food.

Elders in need are as follows:

Adolph Bull Bear
605-454-2190
He remains in need of continued assistance for propane, his son who is disabled lives with him and he is in need of food assistance which you can contact Kyle grocery (above) to make a donation for food. He will also need help with his electric bill.

Arlene Talks (age 72)
605-407-8243
She has a daughter and a granddaughter (age 7) who lives with her and is in need of propane and food assistance and you can contact the propane and grocery above to assist. You could also contact her for mailing address to send items for her granddaughter such as clothes, etc.

Janice One Feather (age 61)
605-455-2889
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 44, Kyle SD 57752
For Propane Delivery give House # 307
She has two grandsons living with her. Asa Steele age 7 and Dillon Westover age 9. You can mail donations for the two boys to the mailing address above for her and if you mail by fedex, UPS, etc use the house #307 Kyle SD 57752. She is in desperate need of food assistance and propane and you can use the info for propane and grocery companies above to pay for those items.

Donna Garnette
605-455-2527
605-441-7541
She has two grandchildren (Boy and girl), you can contact her for an address to offer assistance in clothes, etc for the children. She is in need of Propane and food assistance and you can use the info above for both companies to assist them with that.

Lilly Mae Red Eagle (age 88)
605-455-2612
Mailing address: P.O. Box 2, Kyle SD 57752
For propane delivery give House #HC2
She is in need of Propane and food assistance. You can use the info above for both companies to assist them with that. For deliveries by fedex, ups, etc use the house #HC2 Kyle SD 57752

Perlene Yellow Wolf (age 65 approx)
605-455-1458
She is in need of propane and food assistance. She lives with her daughter Crystal and three children. You can use the info above for both companies to assist them with that. They have a lot of problems with pipes freezing so if anyone in the immediate area could help with this that would be greatly appreciated.

May you be richly blessed for sharing your blessings with these elders and ensuring some relief to their suffering. Please help now as the need is immediate but please remember to help again in the future if you are able to as their needs are continual. Thank you in advance for sharing your love and helping these elders.

Raven Skye WinterHawk

A woman is like a tea bag: you never know how strong she is until she gets in hot water.
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