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We are not a Competition Wacipi, we are a Traditional Wacipi, as most of you know.

Just to clarify some questions.

Come dance, eat and have fun, with the Mendota Community over the weekend.

The Mendota Members would like to invite you to Mendota’s 21th Annual Traditional Wacipi – Pow Wow Sept 10- 11-12-2021.

Website: www.mendotadakota.com

We are not a competition Wacipi; we are a traditional Wacipi, we dance to dance. There is a small payout. Adult’s $25.00, Juniors ages 17 – 9, $20.00, tiny toys 8 – 1, $10.00. This is for each grand entry. Mendota’s way of saying Pidamaya for coming to our Wacipi / Pow Wow from near and far.

St Peter’s Church grounds 1405 Sibley Memorial Hwy Mendota, MN 55120. St Peters Church is the oldest church in MN it was built in 1840.

St Peter’s has graciously let us use the church grounds for 21 years.

Open to the public bring the kids!

No pets allowed for liability reasons. Service Dogs Allowed.

Come get the best fry bread and maple butter and best Indian Tacos ever!

We have some of the best food and craft vendors around.

Come watch all the dancers, especially the tiny tots.

Come see the Kalpulli Huitzillin dancers on Saturday night at 5:00ish.

Let us all dance together!

Friday night opening ceremonies at 5:05 we light the scared fire. People bring a dish to pass for the feast.

We honor all our veterans each year. We have handicap and elder assistance.

MC: Gary Charwood.

Arena Director: Allen Hardy.

Host Drum: Scotty Brown Eyes – Oyate Teca.

Co Host: Drum Midnight Express.

Men’s Head Dancer: David Carson.

Women’s Head Dancer: Lisa Bellanger.

Spiritual Adviser: Chris Mato Nunpa

Mendota Princess: Ameyalli Anderson.

Grand Entry on Sept 11, at 1:00 and 7:00 pm.

Grand entry on Sept 12, at 1:00 pm.

Feast on Sunday around 6:00ish pm.

All buttons are a $5.00 donation, helps pay for the Wacipi. Free admission NO ONE turned away!

No alcohol or drugs.

Bring lawn chairs, seating is limited.

Volunteers are needed, please call Maria McNamara at mmcnamara1954@gmail.com, cell 651-239-5163.

Donations are welcome please send a check to MMDTC.

Tribal Office is 1351 Sibley Memorial Hwy PO Box 50835 Mendota MN, 55150.

Email: mendotadakota@gmail.com

www.mendotadakota.com

Sponsored By: The Mendota Mdewakanton Dakota Tribal Community.

Pidamaya – means Thank You in Dakota.

Tribal Chairwoman Sharon Lennartson.

Jason Delmont Vice Chairman / Secretary.

Joseph Lennartson: Treasurer

Gregory Standmark: Historian

Tommy Tomahawk and Jason Hop: Head Security!

Everything must go through Sharon.

We still need more help with the Wacipi Sept 10-12-2021.

The Wacipi is only around 6 weeks away that will fry by. Started working on Wacipi in March.

Estimate expense for our 21 Wacipi Sept 10-12-2021. Set up Sept 7 -10th.

We have $18,000 for the Wacipi. We still need around $8,000 to pay everything.

Your generosity is greatly appreciated.

Thank you to all who have donated so far.

Security.

Spiritual Adviser.

Paid clean up small jobs.

Adults Dancers woman and men.

Teens.

Tiny Tots.

Host Drum, Co Host, other drums could be up to $3,500.

MC.

Arena Director.

Dancers Registration.

Button Booth.

Honor Guards.

Fry bread fryers two sisters.

Aztec Dancers.

All Supplies.

T Shirts.

History panels $1,400.00, must be turned in by Aug 15.

Food for food booth about $1,200.

Food to feed helpers.

Hotel rooms $1,000.

Pods 160.00.

Toilets $1,000 2 handicaps, 8 reg maybe 9 reg?

Garbage $700.00

Wood.

Buttons.

Tobacco donation.

Sage donation.

Dancers get $75.00 each if they dance all 3 grand entries. We don’t know how many we will have/

Teens $60.00 if they dance all 3 grand entries

Tiny Tots $30.00 if they dance all 3 grand entries

If no price it is because some people don’t want how much their making.

Can you help, you can pick one to pay if you want. If you can donate please email Sharon mendotadakota.com as to which one you can help with.

Any donation small or large will help.

This is Sharon’s last Wacipi. Someone else needs to take over. I have done Wacipi for over 16 years. Turning 75 on August 28. Time to retire.

Pidamaya ye.

Mitakuye Owasin in Dakota.

We Are All Related.

Good Thunder Woman English, ( Wakiya Waste Win ) in Dakota ). A proud Dakota Elder.

Love Sharon

 

 

Donation Request Letter for our 21st Traditional Pow Wow Sept 10-12-2021

Donation Request Letter for our 21st Traditional Pow Wow Sept 10-12-2021 at St Peters Church in Mendota, MN 55150.

Please start to have your donations in by July. That is only a few months, to see what we can buy or not buy?

Gift cards cards welcome.

A Wacipi or (Pow-Wow) is a social gathering that focuses on traditional dance, song, and celebration.

A tribute to a great ancestry, the Wacipi or (Pow Wow) is an event of significance to the Native American Nations. MMDTC has been a community for 26 years.

Our 21st Annual Traditional Wacipi or (Pow-Wow) is September 10-11-12 2021. It can be a valuable and fascinating cultural experience.

As a small tribal community, we operate on member’s contributions and donations. We are not affiliated with the other Minnesota Mdewakanton Dakota communities. We do not have Federal Recognition.

This is also a way to support your local Native American Community in Mendota MN.

A $5 button donation helps with our expenses. No one is turned away, and admission is free. We do accommodate elders, handicap, and veterans. We pay for our event with the help of individual and corporate donors, in-kind donations, charging vendors for craft booth space, and food booth and button sales. Please help us fund this event if you are able.

$20.00  $100 $250   $350  $500 Other $__________. Please make checks to MMDTC.

Gift cards are nice to have for raffle or just to hand out.

We also need volunteers to hold a successful Wacipi. Call the office if you want to volunteer asap.

This year the Mendota Community really needs your help for the Wacipi. We did not have a Wacipi last year because of covid.

We did not get our grant for the Wacipi this year.

The Wacipi must go on; we need to dance.

Along with donations needed to fund this event, we also accept donations for our raffle and auction booth. If you donate, we put you in our brochure.

Please call our office at 651-452-4141 with any questions. We hope that you will consider this request for the important work we do in preserving and sharing our Dakota heritage in Minnesota.

MMDTC. P.O. Box 50835, 1351 Sibley Memorial Hwy Mendota, MN 55150. SEND TO THE P.O. BOX.

Thank You from; Sharon Lennartson Tribal Chairwomen, Jason Delmont Vice Chairman & Secretary, Greg Strandmark Historian, and Joseph Lennartson Treasurer.

The Mendota Tribal Council & Wacipi Committee.

Minnesota Indian Women’s Sexual Assault Coalition Information

MIWSAC Transparent Logo Color
Creating Safety and Justice Through the Teachings of Our Grandmothers

4 Dakota landmarks hide in plain sight along the Mississippi River.

Nice article about Dakota sacred sites. Mendota calls this  Mdota.

4 Dakota landmarks hide in plain sight along the Mississippi River.

To increase knowledge of Dakota culture and heritage, the Minnesota Humanities Center worked with Dakota scholars to develop a tour of significant sites.

The Dakota call a baby’s first cry “bdote,” a word also used to describe the confluence of two rivers. In Dakota culture, water is as sacred and primary as a newborn’s gasp for air.

The bdote of the Minnesota and Mississippi rivers is among the most important to the Dakota, with sites of birth and burial, hurt and healing tucked into the modern urban infrastructure along the shores.

Although the Dakota are considered Minnesota’s first people, their history and lives have often been absent from the dominant narrative. But recent controversies at local institutions have raised greater awareness of the Dakota perspective. This summer, Lake Calhoun officially reverted to its Dakota name, Bde Maka Ska. Last summer, the Walker Art Center removed a sculpture evoking the 1862 hanging of 38 Dakota men. Around the same time, Alexander Ramsey Middle School in Minneapolis dropped its association with the Minnesota governor who declared that all Dakota “must be exterminated or driven forever beyond the borders of the state.”

To increase local knowledge of Dakota culture and heritage, the Minnesota Humanities Center worked with Dakota scholars to develop a daylong guided tour of ­significant native sites, including Mounds Park, Wakan Tipi, Fort Snelling and Pilot Knob. Whether you visit these sites on your own or as part of the tour, here’s what to expect.

 

 

Indian Mounds Regional Park (10 Mounds Blvd., St. Paul)

The earthen mounds were created by indigenous people 2,000 years ago on a bluff overlooking the Mississippi River, across from what is now the St. Paul Downtown Airport. There were once dozens of sacred burial mounds in the area before they were razed by developers and the city of St. Paul, which now owns the park. Today, six mounds remain, enrobed in tall grass and wildflowers.

Years ago, the city used to mow them. Outdoor enthusiasts scaled them, covered the area with toboggan tracks and even used it as a ski jump. In the 1800s, the mounds were sloppily excavated and likely looted. Bones and other objects went to the Minnesota Historical Society, Macalester College and other museum or personal collections. A 1990 federal law strengthens protections for grave sites and helps repatriate the artifacts.

The mounds are listed on the National Register of Historic Places and surrounded by wrought-iron fences to protect them. Descendants of the people who built them conduct ceremonies there today, and visitors are asked to respect the ancient site.

Wakan Tipi at Bruce Vento Nature Sanctuary (4th Street E., St. Paul)

On this marshy flood plain beside the Mississippi, a limestone cave known as Wakan Tipi, or House of the Spirits, was an important tribal meeting site long before explorer Jonathan Carver was credited with its discovery.

It’s less than a mile from downtown St. Paul, but feels worlds apart. In the restored woodland and wetland, you can see bald eagles and blue herons. Water bubbles up from a spring near the cave’s entrance, creating a habitat for medicinal plants.

The enormous steel plate that used to barricade the cave has been replaced by less foreboding fencing. But both structures arrived too late to protect the animal petroglyphs once carved into the cave’s soft yellow stone. The images were destroyed, along with the front of the cave, when the area served as an industrial railroad corridor in the mid-1800s.

The area’s old brewery, sawmills and lumberyards have since shuttered, and the long polluted site was abandoned by the 1970s. After an extensive cleanup effort, it became the Bruce Vento Nature Sanctuary in 2005.

Historic Fort Snelling/Fort Snelling State Park (200 Tower Av. and 101 Snelling Lake Rd., St. Paul)

The Minnesota Historical Society operates the massive stone fortress perched above the nexus of the Mississippi and Minnesota rivers, while the Department of Natural Resources runs the wooded state park at water’s edge.

The fort features period re-enactors who forge metal and fire cannons. Until a few years ago, it hosted kids’ birthday parties. But it’s not a celebratory place for the Dakota.

In 1862, as the Dakota men who had fought U.S. soldiers and settlers faced military trials, a group of more than 1,600 Dakota, mostly women, children and elderly, were forcibly marched more than 100 miles from the Lower Sioux reservation to Fort Snelling. The marchers suffered physical abuse and were attacked by angry mobs of settlers as they passed through towns. Many died during the journey and in the months the group was interned at Fort Snelling.

Recently, the Historical Society has begun describing the stockade where the Dakota were held as a concentration camp. Although the captives were not executed, it was part of a genocidal policy.

In 2002, the first Dakota Commemorative March retraced the route to remember those who endured the trip. The weeklong walk, which has typically taken place every other year since, ends at the park, where a memorial structure of large wooden beams sits beside the visitors center.

Pilot Knob (Pilot Knob Rd., Mendota Heights)

A high bluff in Mendota Heights looks out on Fort Snelling, with sweeping views of the river valley and the Minneapolis and St. Paul skylines. In Dakota, it’s known as Oheyawahi, “a hill much visited,” and was a site for ceremony and burials.

Behind a cemetery and an off-leash dog park, a path to the edge of the bluff winds through the tall grass prairie, spiked with black-eyed Susans and purple bergamot. It leads to seven 2-ton limestone blocks, arranged in a circle as seats for representatives of the seven Dakota divisions, or council fires. After nearly becoming a townhouse development in 2002, Pilot Knob is now on the National Register.

In 1851, the Treaty of Mendota was signed here, moving the Dakota off their homeland and onto reservations. On a sign that explains how the treaty “transferred 35 million acres of Dakota land to the United States,” the word “transferred” has been scratched out and replaced with the word “STOLE.”

Very sad to have lost these woman within a short time of each other all good friends.

We will be honoring these woman at our Wacipi Sept 10 -12-2021.

Sister Jan Dalsin

Jeannie Hollingworth’s

Christina Fowler Mrs. John Gebhardt

Cheryl Fields

These 4 amazing woman were around since the Coldwater and Hi Way 55 days.

All would have been at the Wacipi vending, dancing, showing support, just being the loving woman they all were.

They will all be dearly missed.

We will honor them, if you would like to say something about any or all, please let us know asap.

If anyone want to get pictures of each of them let me know.

We need someone to organize this like pictures, stories, etc.

The Mendota Tribal Council and it Members.

Love you all, until we meet again. Love Good Thunder Woman. Sharon

 

 

Cheryl Fields May 28, 1950 – July 1st 2021 age 71. Just hear this 2 hours ago on 7-11-21 very sad.

 

Christina J. Fowler November 19, 1971 ~ June 24, 2021 (age 49) Service in Aug.

Christina J. Fowler

November 19, 1971 ~ June 24, 2021 (age 49)

Obituary

Christina Johanna Fowler 49, passed away at her home in St Paul MN on the evening of Thursday June 24, 2021.

Formerly from Boise Idaho, Christina enjoyed her work as a Massage Therapist and a Native American Artist.  She participated in women’s traditional dancing at Native American Pow Wows over the years.  Her artwork included Native American crafts, jewelry, and beadwork. Christina enjoyed sharing her knowledge.

She is survived by her husband of 9 years John, brother David (Debbie), parents Susan and Darrell, her daughter Amethyst, as well as granddaughters Kara and Gracen.

Christina is  lovingly remembered by all who knew her.

 

If you are donating to the Wacipi / Pow Wow Gift Cards people seem to like.

If you do please give Walmart or Target gift cards again, people seen to like them.

Gift cards from Lucky’s or Axel’s are good too. Anywhere is good, even fast food. Anything will be appreciated!
Send cards to:
Sharon Lennartson
The Powwow Committee / MMDTC
945 Redwood Dr
Apple Valley, MN 55124

Minnesota Human Rights Act.

(Minnesota Human Rights Act) Does the Mendota Mdewakanton Dakota Tribal Community have any RIGHTS! It sure does not feels like we do?

We only want what belongs to us as Native Americans Indigenous People of Minnesota. Our rights, dignity, respect, and honorary.

The Mendota Tribal Council.

Sharon Lennartson Tribal Chairwoman 651-452-4141 Tribal Office in Mendota, MN 55150.

Canton Asylum for Insane Native American Indians. Horrific Place to put our people.

Canton Asylum for Insane Indians

View across a grassy area with trees and fence in the background.

Quick Facts

The Canton Asylum cemetery is located on the Hiawatha Municipal Golf course. The land has a gentle slope with trees nearby. The cemetery is enclosed by a split-rail fence, which was installed circa 1992. The fence was installed to deter golfers from playing through the cemetery. This action has been somewhat successful. The cemetery is approximately 120 feet by 80 feet. The cemetery is located between the golf course clubhouse and Canton-lnwood Hospital.

The first death occurred at the asylum on May 20, 1903. The superintendent notified the agent of the reservation where the patient had originally lived. After receiving no request to send the body home, the superintendent made arrangement for an interment on the grounds. A section of land was reserved, and over the next thirty years, it received the remains of patients at the asylum. The Bureau of Indian Affairs informed Superintendent Gifford that stone markers were unwarranted, so the graves were unmarked. On a chart hanging in the office, the superintendent recorded the name and location of each deceased patient. However in 1970, a complete burial stone with a bronze plaque was placed in the cemetery. Listed on the plaque are the names of 120 patients who had died and were buried at Canton during the thirty-two years of the institution.

The Canton Asylum Cemetery is historically significant for its association with the Native Americans (Indians) and the Canton Asylum for Insane Indians. The cemetery was used between 1903 and 1934 for the patients at the Asylum. The Canton Asylum was the second federal institution for the insane, predated only by Saint Elizabeths in Washington, D. C., which had been established in 1855. 1 In the late 1940s, the asylum was razed. The cemetery is the only remaining site associated with the asylum. The Canton Asylum Cemetery relates to the South Dakota State context in the areas of Depression and Rebuilding 1893-1929, under Civic Improvements and New Government-Related Structures and Sioux Era 1750 to present, under Government-Constructed sites and structures.

Announcement of our Wacipi organization and rules.

The Mendota Members would like to invite you to Mendota’s 21th Annual Traditional Wacipi – Pow Wow Sept 10- 11-12-2021.

Website: www.mendotadakota.com

We are not a competition Wacipi; we are a traditional Wacipi, we dance to dance. There is a small payout. Adult’s $25.00, Juniors ages 17 – 9, $20.00, tiny toys 8 – 1, $10.00. This is for each grand entry. Mendota’s way of saying Pidamaya for coming to our Wacipi / Pow Wow from near and far.

St Peter’s Church grounds 1405 Sibley Memorial Hwy Mendota, MN 55120. St Peters Church is the oldest church in MN it was built in 1840.

St Peter’s has graciously let us use the church grounds for 21 years.

Open to the public bring the kids!

No pets allowed for liability reasons. Service Dogs Allowed.

Come get the best fry bread and maple butter and best Indian Tacos ever!

We have some of the best food and craft vendors around.

Come watch all the dancers, especially the tiny tots.

Come see the Kalpulli Huitzillin dancers on Saturday night at 5:00ish.

Let us all dance together!

Friday night opening ceremonies at 5:05 we light the scared fire. People bring a dish to pass for the feast.

We honor all our veterans each year. We have handicap and elder assistance.

MC: Gary Charwood.

Arena Director: Allen Hardy.

Host Drum: Scotty Brown Eyes – Oyate Teca.

Co Host: Drum Midnight Express.

Men’s Head Dancer: David Carson.

Women’s Head Dancer: Lisa Bellanger.

Spiritual Adviser: Chris Mato Nunpa

Mendota Princess: Ameyalli Anderson.

Grand Entry on Sept 11, at 1:00 and 7:00 pm.

Grand entry on Sept 12, at 1:00 pm.

Feast on Sunday around 6:00ish pm.

All buttons are a $5.00 donation, helps pay for the Wacipi. Free admission NO ONE turned away!

No alcohol or drugs.

Bring lawn chairs, seating is limited.

Volunteers are needed, please call Maria McNamara at mmcnamara1954@gmail.com, cell 651-239-5163.

Donations are welcome please send a check to MMDTC.

Tribal Office is 1351 Sibley Memorial Hwy PO Box 50835 Mendota MN, 55150.

Email: mendotadakota@gmail.com

www.mendotadakota.com

Sponsored By: The Mendota Mdewakanton Dakota Tribal Community.

Pidamaya – means Thank You in Dakota.

Tribal Chairwoman Sharon Lennartson.

Jason Delmont Vice Chairman / Secretary.

Joseph Lennartson: Treasurer

Gregory Standmark: Historian

Tommy Tomahawk and Jason Hop: Head Security!

Peace Pipeline Video

There is an ancient Lakota prophecy about a black snake that would slither across the land, desecrating the sacred sites and poisonings the water before destroying the earth.

Oil companies routinely build pipelines through Indigenous lands, often destroying sacred sites. How do non-natives feel when the shoe is on the other foot?

New geneaology information for Sharon Lennartson: Great-great-grandfather

Eustache Weshtash O mon dah gah ne ne en Bellecourt Great-great-grandfather

Hi Sharon,
We discovered new information for you in historical records.
Explore this week’s best Record Matches.

In your tree:

Eustache Weshtash O mon dah gah ne ne en Bellecourt
Great-great-grandfather
Birth: 1819 – Leech Lake Township, Cass, Minnesota, United States
Death: July 3 1894 – White Earth, Becker, Minnesota, United States
In FamilySearch Family Tree:

Eustache Weshtash O mon dah gah ne ne en Bellecourt
Birth: 1819 – Place
Death: Day  Month 1894 – Place
Parents: Names of both parents
Wife: Name of wife
Children: Margaret Mary Felix and names of 11 more children
Siblings: Nancy AH KEE LEN QUAECHE LANGO Ketchum and names of 7 more siblings

New information: father, mother, sibling(s) and child(ren).

Dakota Dance Styles

If you make a donation you will be added to our donation sign at the pow wow!

Big or small you will be added to our donations list. We appreciate your help. We will have a big sign at the Wacipi.

Please pay by check, money order.

You can pay by Pal Pay or any other ways, also they charge fees that come out of the money you would send.

We have a Pay Pal icon on our site if that’s what you prefer.

Please check out our website often. New articles on there daily. www.mendotadakota.com

We have been on Drum Hop and Powwows.com since March 21. Tried to update had a hard time? I will get it update soon.

If I don’t get it edited in a few days. I will put the information on our site. I have received many emails about the Wacipi. So I know people have seen us on Powwows.com and Drum Hop.

Pidamaya Tribal Council, and  Pow Wow Committee.

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